All news

Labour Day - 8 hours work, 8 hours rest, 8 hours recreation

Monday 23/10/2017

The story of the campaign for an 8 hour working day is told in the online NZ History site    

New Zealand workers were among the first in the world to claim this right when, in 1840, the carpenter Samuel Parnell won an eight-hour day in Wellington. Labour Day was first celebrated in New Zealand on 28 October 1890, when several thousand trade union members and supporters attended parades in the main centres. Government employees were given the day off to attend the parades and many businesses closed for at least part of the day.

Early Labour Day parades drew huge crowds in places such as Palmerston North and Napier as well as in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin. Unionists and supporters marched behind colourful banners and ornate floats, and the parades were followed by popular picnics and sports events.

These parades also had a political purpose. Although workers in some industries had long enjoyed an eight-hour day, it was not a legal entitlement. Other workers, including seamen, farm labourers, and hotel, restaurant and shop employees, still worked much longer hours. Many also endured unpleasant and sometimes dangerous working conditions. Unionists wanted the Liberal government of the day to pass legislation enforcing an eight-hour day for all workers, but the government was reluctant to antagonise the business community.

The Liberal Government of 1900 finally made it a public holiday which was ‘Mondayised’ in 1910.  Although unionists and their supporters continued to hold popular gatherings and sports events, by the 1920s Labour Day had begun to decline as a public spectacle. For most New Zealanders, it was now just another holiday.

However, changes in lifestyles and conditions continue to be matters of debate and review to this day, with work hours and a “living wage” once again the focus of workers’ needs.  

Go to top